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  #1  
Old September 7th, 2007, 09:11
Taggart Taggart is offline
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Default Graham Chapman's

I read an interesting account of John Cleese's funeral speech for Graham Chapman. They were both members of the Monty Python comic group.

In Eric Idle's book, he describes how Cleese used comedy to break the wave of emotion, and jokingly spoke ill of Chapman, using language that I won't repeat here.

I realize that's a very off-the-wall approach but in its context, it sounded quite appropriate to that particular situation, as told by Idle.
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  #2  
Old September 9th, 2007, 21:02
Priscilla Priscilla is offline
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Somewhere on Youtube is a video of this eulogy. It is awesome! It seems kind of mean if you don't understand Monty Python, but it was so suiting. John Cleese and Graham Chapman were very good friends and I think that the troop gave Graham a wonderful sendoff.
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  #3  
Old September 11th, 2007, 09:00
Taggart Taggart is offline
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Thanks for mentioning the video, Priscilla. I thought about the fact that some people here may not be familiar with the Pythons, and it would seem inappropriate.

This reminds me of seeing Robin Williams on a talk show the day after his father's funeral and watching him joke about it. It's hard to describe, but it wasn't disrespectful, and the comedy seemed to ease his pain a little.
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  #4  
Old September 11th, 2007, 14:41
Priscilla Priscilla is offline
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Don't mention it, Taggart. I watch the video often because it makes me think about my friends death and how we were watching Monthy Python's 'The meaning of Life" when we learned of it. We just kept watching the movie and laughed through our sorrow.
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  #5  
Old September 18th, 2007, 20:08
Calypso Calypso is offline
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I guess it's pretty common knowledge that most people who work in medicine or social services develops a strong sense of "gallows" humor. Sometimes you have to laugh just to stay sane. Besides, I don't think laughter is a bad legacy at all. I'm sure the people I have lost would want me to remember the fun (and funny) times, even if it might seem "disrespectful" to some people.
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  #6  
Old September 22nd, 2007, 10:13
Priscilla Priscilla is offline
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I love to laugh. It is like a gift to me when people make me laugh and I would like a couple jokes told at my wake on my behalf so that the people in my life can have this little gift in their time of sadness.
My parting sentiments to my loved ones: a quote from Red Dwarf: "Don't think of me as dead. Think of me as someone who is no longer a threat to your marriage."
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  #7  
Old September 28th, 2007, 09:49
Taggart Taggart is offline
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That's funny, Priscilla. It reminds me of a quote from someone who was a comedian, I think. Sorry I don't recall the name but the quote was from his deathbed and he said something like "Dying is easy... Comedy is hard."

I admire his courage and sense of humour.
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  #8  
Old September 28th, 2007, 21:00
echos echos is offline
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So true. Comedy is the hard one. Remember when John Bulshi died and Dan Ackroyd drove his Harley Davidson in the furneral march to the cementary. Alot of people disproved of that too. But ,it would have tickled John very much. I love the diveristy in furnerals
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  #9  
Old September 30th, 2007, 20:35
Priscilla Priscilla is offline
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I think it's important to give the send off that is fitting to the deceased. This is important because the mourners need to still feel that connection with their loved one.
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  #10  
Old October 13th, 2007, 10:50
Taggart Taggart is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by echos View Post
So true. Comedy is the hard one. Remember when John Bulshi died and Dan Ackroyd drove his Harley Davidson in the furneral march to the cementary. Alot of people disproved of that too. But ,it would have tickled John very much. I love the diveristy in furnerals
I remember reading in Wired, the story of John Belushi, that John and Dan had discussed how his funeral should be.

I think it also included a very off-the-wall choice for a musical piece, too.

John Belushi and Dan Ackroyd were definitely on the same page about this.
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