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  #1  
Old March 18th, 2008, 11:38
luciestorrs luciestorrs is offline
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Default Why don't more people donate organs?

Demand for donated organs hugely exceeds supply. Comparatively few people die in the circumstances required for a successful organ transplant, and welcome advances in life-saving medical care exacerbate the shortfall. A recent UK survey revealed that, while 90 per cent of the population support organ donation in principle, only 22 per cent are on the organ donor register.

While evidence is still anecdotal as to why more people don't donate, the main reason appears to be the fear that, in a life-saving situation, donors may not receive the same medical attention as non-donors from doctors anxious to harvest healthy organs. This fear is ungrounded. A doctor's first duty is to the patient in his or her care. If, despite all efforts, a patient dies, it is only then that organ donation can be considered. Organ removal is carried out by a different team of doctors and all wounds are stitched and dressed with as much care as if the patient were living.

If you have decided to be a donor, it is vital to discuss it with your family. Forty per cent of grieving relatives do not agree to donation, and one of the main reasons is that they are not convinced it is what the deceased wanted. A conversation about your wishes is a matter of kindness to those you love. To those waiting for a transplant, it is a matter of life and death.

www.uktransplant.org.uk
www.organdonor.gov
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  #2  
Old March 18th, 2008, 15:22
sacback sacback is offline
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[quote=luciestorrs;2574]While evidence is still anecdotal as to why more people don't donate, the main reason appears to be the fear that, in a life-saving situation, donors may not receive the same medical attention as non-donors from doctors anxious to harvest healthy organs.[quote]

I think maybe someone needs to look more closely at the reasons why more people don't donate. I know that several religions forbid organ donations. This may play a large role in it. Some ties families are just so grief-striken that they can not stand the thought of their loved one going through that, even though they have passed.

I don't think it comes down to distrusting the doctors. I think it is a much more emotional decision than that.
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Old March 19th, 2008, 01:03
ginahunt3 ginahunt3 is offline
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I am a donor & have been since I was 16, but when my grandparents died, we chose not to donate. I am not sure why, but I think we felt that they had been through enough so that we didn't want to put their bodies anymore. My driver's license has donor on it & I have a living will which states that I want to donate. Many people aren't sure what their loved ones want that's why it its important to have a living will & be specific so that the family is sure of what is wanted.
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Old March 19th, 2008, 15:16
sacback sacback is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ginahunt3 View Post
Many people aren't sure what their loved ones want that's why it its important to have a living will & be specific so that the family is sure of what is wanted.
I think that's the key. When a loved one has left documentation of their wants/desires it is easier for the family. The don't have to worry about feeling as if they've made the "wrong" desicion.
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Old March 20th, 2008, 17:52
Nicola Nicola is offline
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In the Uk, if an organ donor passes away and their family say that they dont want the organs removed then the organs are not removed.

I think they are trying to get a scheme together where everyone is automatically an organ donor but they dont want to be then they have to register as so.
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Old March 20th, 2008, 20:45
trick-r-treat trick-r-treat is offline
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I am a donor, but I have to say that I have wondered that if and when I come back, will I be missing something? Will I come back deformed?
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  #7  
Old March 21st, 2008, 13:52
Nicola Nicola is offline
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Why worry about when you come back ? That is a completely different life. When you die, you dont need your organs wherever you're going, i would okayed it with my mum and sisters for my dads organs to be donated but they were ravaged with cancer so they were no use to anyone
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Old November 4th, 2008, 11:13
WillNeverForgetYou WillNeverForgetYou is offline
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I think it should certainly be the other way round, where you need a card to say you DON'T want to donate. That way those who are strongly against it will be able to get a card and those who don't mind but haven't got round to it will have their organs used. It's a great relief to know your loss has helped someone else...it really can make things easier!
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