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Old May 1st, 2011, 06:49
biotian biotian is offline
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Smile Coping with the loss of a person you love - advice from the bible. Please Read!

The death of a loved one gets you devastated. If you’ve ever lost a parent, a child or someone really, really close you know what I’m talking about. I’m here to offer some help from the bible that I hope anyone reading will find beneficial.

Maybe you don’t think god exists or you don’t believe in god or the bible. But what if, just what if god did exist and the bible based principles given were valid ones? Don’t you think you out to atleast search for god? Consider the following.

It is only normal, to feel trapped in a vortex of emotion when someone we love dies. The Bible says that when the patriarch Jacob was told that his son Joseph had died, he “ripped his mantles apart” in an outburst of grief. And even though “all his sons and all his daughters kept rising up to comfort him, . . . he kept refusing to take comfort.” (Genesis 37:34, 35) You may similarly feel that the pain is so deep that it will never go away.

In time, it can. But the key is facing, instead of trying to ignore your pain. Allowing oneself to grieve has many benefits. Says the book The Art of Condolence: “The bereaved need to allow the pain and anguish of their suffering to take place. Healing is hampered by resisting the process.” Driven by the myth that real men don’t cry, however, some boys may find it particularly hard to express their feelings. But the greatest man who ever lived openly “gave way to tears” when his friend Lazarus died. (John 11:35) And tears are certainly appropriate when one has lost a parent. So feel free to mourn and weep. (Compare James 4:9.) Says the book Death and Grief in the Family: “Crying is one of the most important ways of getting the sadness out.”

In Bible times, King David expressed his grief for his best friend, Jonathan, not only by weeping but also by putting his feelings in writing. “I am distressed over you, my brother Jonathan, very pleasant you were to me,” wrote David in the beautiful lament he called “The Bow.”—2 Samuel 1:18, 26.

You may likewise find it helpful to put your feelings in writing. The book Giving Sorrow Words says: “Writing your feelings down can help in getting locked-up emotions out. . . . When you get angry, when you feel sad, write it down.” One teenage girl named Shannon says: “I kept a diary. I wrote down all my feelings. All my feelings flat out on paper. Everything I felt was on paper and that helped a lot . . . writing everything down.”

Another aid is physical exercise. “Bodily training is beneficial,” says the Bible. (1 Timothy 4:8) And notes one book on grieving: “Exercise is a good way of releasing energy.” An invigorating run, a brisk walk, or a refreshing bicycle ride can do much to help you work off the tensions that can build up when you are sad and grieving.

Talk to someone you love. Proverbs 17:17 says: “A true companion is loving all the time, and is a brother that is born for when there is distress.” After her mother’s death, young Morfydd leaned heavily upon the local congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses. “All the elders were very supportive,” she recalls, “but one in particular was always ready to listen to me.”

Why not reach out for such help and support? Let someone know that you need to talk. Perhaps you feel angry, scared, or guilty. Or maybe you simply feel lonely and miss your parent. Talking things out with a sympathetic listener can really help. Keep reflecting, too, on the Bible-based hope of the resurrection and the prospect of seeing your parent once again—on a paradise earth. (Luke 23:43; Acts 24:15) Says young Kim who lost her father in death: “I think about my father every day. But I know he wouldn’t want us to give up or let anything halt our service to Jehovah. I want to be there to greet him when he returns in the resurrection.”—John 5:28, 29.

Keep reflecting, too, on the Bible-based hope of the resurrection and the prospect of seeing your parent once again—on a paradise earth. (Luke 23:43; Acts 24:15) Says young Kim who lost her father in death: “I think about my father every day. But I know he wouldn’t want us to give up or let anything halt our service to Jehovah. I want to be there to greet him when he returns in the resurrection.”—John 5:28, 29.

If you’re interesting in knowing more about the bible and what it promises for mankind, ask for a free home bible study, the next time a Jehovah’s Witness comes tapping at your door. You can also visit www.watchtower.org for more information.

Have a great day!

Sheran
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